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portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the nation
for that process. i have introduced with having law enforcement agencies to enforce restricting gun trafficking. others want to ban ammunition clips and others have proposed modifications to the background check system to keep guns out of the wrong hands while not unnecessarily burdening law- abiding citizens. i am a lifelong vermonter. i know gun store owners in vermont. they follow the law. they conduct background checks to prevent getting guns to those who should not have them. they wonder why others who sell guns to not have to follow the same protective rules. i agree with these responsible business owners. if we could all agree that criminals and those adjudicated mentally ill should not buy firearms, why should we not try to plug the loopholes in the law that allows them to buy guns without background checks? it is a simple matter of common sense. if we agree the background check system is worth while, shouldn't we try to improve its content and use it so it can be more effective? what responsible gun owner objects to improving the background check system? when i bought firearms in vermo
developments. we expect to hear confirmation from authorities in 5 to 10 minutes. we are hearing from a law enforcement official telling fox that the boy, the 5-year-old boy who has been held in the under ground bunker in the area you see behind me coming up on 7 days, that he has been released and that he is, quote, okay. the same law enforcement official also saying that the suspect, 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes who had been -- allegedly holding this boy in his backyard bunker all this time, that the suspect in the case is dead. kimberly, all of this began last tuesday afternoon. the boy was riding home on a school bus in this neighborhood, in this area where i am when a gunman boarded the bus, the bus driver positioned himself between the gunman and the children. the gunman opened fire fatally wounding mr. poland and one of the children was taken hostage. that child being that 5-year-old brought to a backyard bunker in the backyard of this suspect jimmy lee dykes, a 65-year-old who neighbors describe as very territorial someone who would become violent if neighbors or even a dog would ven
up in three weeks in toronto at our annual meeting. it tells people going to law school exactly what they are in for and you need to understand that the accreditation part of the american bar association is under a completely separate organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you ha
do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because everyone they know voted against him. the point is, we have different perspectives on this. the reason i will oppose the legislation, chief johnston, is because i respect what you do as a law-enforcement officer. has your budget been cut? >> yes. >> will it be cut in the future? >> i am optimistic that it is not. >> because of the fiscal state of affairs we have, there will be less police officers, not more, over the next decade. response time will be m
king. >> a whopper of a [eagle caw] >> stephen: tonight, do states have to follow federal law? only if it starts with "simon says." bailiff lf. [ laughter ] then, what's the latest news in the war on terror? the answer is redacted. [ laughter ] and my guest george saunders wrote what the new york times called "the best book you'll read this year." joke's on them, i'm not reading any books this year. [ laughter ] eating lunch earlier can help you lose weight. that's why i always eat tomorrow's lunch tonight. [ laughter ] captioning sponsored by comedy central this is "the colbert report." ["the colbert report" theme music playing] [cheers and applause] welcome to the broadcast, everybody. thank you so much. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting stephen b.c. [ thank you, ladies and gentlemen. [cheers and applause] thank so much. please, nation, heros sit down. welcome to the broadcast, coming to you, as always, in bone-jostling sensurround! [ laughter ] a lot of technology. [ laughter ] nation, for years i've been warning you about iran. they're almost as big a threat as our other ene
>>> president obama urges seizing this moment to overhaul our nation's immigration laws. >> now is the time to find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as the land of opportunity. >> what does this mean for california? from the central valley to silicon valley? >>> and san francisco implements a controversial law. it enables court-ordered treatment for mentally ill patients at risk of becoming violent. >> these folks are a danger to themselves and to others. >>> plus, the 49ers gear up for the super bowl. a report from new orleans. coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm viviana ritado. welcome to "this week in northern california." what happens or doesn't happen in washington on immigration this year will have a big impact here in california. president obama pressed congress to pass within the next six months comprehensive immigration reform. he addressed this issue in las vegas on tuesday. >> if congress is unable to move forward in a timely fashion, i will send up a bill based on my proposal and insist that they vote on it right away.
be taken in burglaries. >> those bordering states and those are the laws in nevada. >> until last tuesday, california had the strongest gun laws in the united states, arizona the weakest and we are next door >> so someone could go to a gun show across the board and board and border and do that weapon. >> i just have a question regarding the last firearm. on the pictures that we have here, there is rifles, semi, automatic and then there is the assault weapon. the magazine clip, on the semiautomatic, does that change the rifle into a it. >> if you take that banana magazine away that comes under the semiautomatic rifle. >> yes. >> once you put that banana magazine on you it falls down on a fully or modified? >> it would be an assault weapon, semi, auto assault weapon >> another category. >> we can spend a whole day talking about the different ways or the different types of assault weapons that there are. here is another as we speak, it is an assault pistol, which is a mack ten and a 45 caliber and this one is shoot very quickly and accept the magazines up to 30 rounds and the whole magazine
. thank you for joining us. >> great to be here. longtime fan. did you know? [laughter] against the law. just a warning this time. [ laughter ] >> jon: cuff it it's the fuzz. how are you? thanks for joining us. i want to talk about two things. we don't have a ton of time because obviously you are fighting crime. the first thing is going to be guns. there's a huge discussion on guns in this country right now. but it seems like there are lobby groups and advocacy groups, not a lot of law enforcement, seems like they should be the focus of discussion rather than not. is there a reason for that the? is law enforcement not allowed or permitted to take a public stand on what they might favor for gun issue? >> the think the big organizations have been speaking out about it. you saw the president yesterday in minnesota with a group of police officers. so i think parts are engaged, maybe not speak as loud as we could. chuck ram si has been the head of agency has been articulate and outspoken. law enforcement has a personal concern about guns and gun safety. police officers, over 150 a year. >> j
are lawful immigrants. so any way you cut it, it's going to have a huge impact. some of the -- and there's a lot in here for everyone. employers, students who came here at a young age. they're called dreamers. agricultural workers. some of the things that people may not be aware of, in the president's proposal, lgbt families will be able to sponsor their family members. >> and that's from the president's proposal but not in the so-called gang of eight. >> it's not in the gang of eight proposal. but i think one of other issues for californians to, in terms of watching this debate and participating in it, is to understand what the road blocks are. because it's not just smooth sailing. there's a lot of concern about high fines for low-income immigrants. the requirements such as civics and english. even before you can get a green card. those are requirements we have for people who can become citizens. not for getting a green card. and the biggest thing is getting in the back of the line, because our legal immigration system is to backlogged. right now people who've sponsored someone, a sibli
now. >> monica says without leadership, this money mess is getting worse. >> well, who needs the law. the law dictates that the president is supposed to submit a budget by a certain date, today, and fourth year in a row no budget. >> let's roll this out of neil. this is neil just five months ago. can we play that? take a listen. >> it does seem a bestbit ironic that we have, according to the united states treasurery, eclipsed a $16 trillion debt level collectively what we owe as nation now going over $16 trillion. >> that was five months ago. five months ago we spent 500 billion -- half a trillion dollars. >> it's amazing. this president has committed budgets over the last couple of years but each one has been so obscene that he can't even get a single democrat to vote for his budget. so, whatever he proposed -- we talk about today's legal deadline. whatever he proposes is going to be so ludicrous that even members of his own party won't go along with it. every president since the end of world war ii of both parties has usually kept federal spending as a percentage of gdp between 18
company -- >> the rule of law isn't really the rule of law if it doesn't apply equally to everybody. i mean, if you're going to put somebody in jail for having a joint is his pocket, you can't let higher ranking hsbc officials off for laundering $800 million for the worst drug dealers in the entire world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert
prem at mukherjee -- pranab mukherjee signed a new law. i realize there are lots of reporting restrictions. what do we actually know about the events in court today? >> as you mentioned, only one witness took the stand. he was the key prosecution witness, the male friend of the young woman who was gang raped and then murdered last december. he was brought here in a wheelchair. he, too, received injuries during that attack, allegedly at the hands of the five men charged in woman's murder and gang rape. also at the court, apart from the five men, the bus where the attack took place was driven into the complex. the entire day was taken up with the prosecution prove -- presenting their key witness. the court will convene tomorrow morning. the defense will get their chance to cross-examine this witness. he is the first of about 80 witnesses the prosecution is expected to field, including police officers, forensic experts, and doctors, who did their best to try to save the young woman's life. >> this whole case takes place against a backdrop in which the government, if you like, is
feelings rather than by the law. i can't tell you how many times when i was a lawyer and sometimes even now you read an opinion below and you say "what's motivating this?" is it the law or a person feeling? >> rose: what's the danger here? >> the danger is that you think of judges as computers, which we are not. we are human beings with strengths and weaknesses with limit takes in our life experiences. you want us to be aware of both those things. the good and the bad, the biases and the prejudices so that we actually work consciously at not letting them influence our outcomes. that we don't assume that we're right about our biases. that we don't assume that we're not human beings unaffected by our emotions. and that we work hard. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. sh
, a democrat, and chuck grassley of iowa, a republican, are outraged that the giant banks violate the law with impunity -- laundering money, cheating homeowners, falsifying information -- every trick in the ledger book. they sent a letter to attorney general eric holder demanding to know why the banks get away with fines instead of jail time. maybe they had their anger roiled by "frontline," public television's premier investigative series. the other night, "frontline" broadcast a report called "the untouchables," on how the department of justice allegedly has looked the other way for fear that prosecuting the banks would do even more damage to the american economy. >> it was a definite sense that justice backed off. >> did the government fail? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to r
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays
pressure on law makers. tom joins us now. this trip expected to be the first of many. >> the administration's goal is to build on what it sees as momentum following last week's hearing on gun control. supporters of the president's plan say time is important. they want to hold on to the public's attention. gun rights advocates say is they saw a rush to pass new gun laws in their view has eased. >> president obama led a round table in an effort to rewrite gun laws. >> which don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> that something includes 23 gun control proposals the president endorsed after the school shooting. limiting ammunition clips and expanding background checks. >> we're not going to save every life but we can make a difference. and that's our responsibility as americans. >> but the head of the nra says instead of limiting gun use by people who follow the law, shouldwork to end laws that allow mentally unstable people to buy guns. >> they won't do it. the hppa laws won't do it. we're all for it. but it's not. >> over the weekend is a lead up to the presi
is not intended to serve as a template for law enforcement or act as regulation for current law, but as a way to explore current issues. a lot of this was based on our march 2012 report protecting consumer privacy in an era of graphic change. we called upon companies to implement privacy by design and to provide consumers with simplified choices to increase transparency by providing clearer, joyner, and more standardized privacy analysis. -- shorter and more standardized privacy notices. i wanted to give you the contents of a preview of what of the technology issues are and some of being thought c-f-t-c is bringing to bear in this area. i have not -- some of these thoughts the ftc is bringing to bear in this area. later, we will take audience questions. during the rest of this panel in. we have a great group. it is one of those days. some of us did have a guinness last night. and have the council with congresswoman lofgren. i want to start out talking with the -- about the ftc report. there are a few lines in the report that speaks directly to what consumers do and do not know. consumers like
, and i would like to also thank law enforcement for coming into the tenderloin district more often. i really appreciate the hard core law enforcement and i'm asking for more. please fit that into the budget, it is a must. that district is really bad. i know it's not the only district, but the need for more hard core law enforcement is a must. black crime is all over the tenderloin district. drugs are being sold and used in the streets everywhere. remember my paperwork that i gave to you in september 2012 requesting major sting operations. please refer to that paperwork again because i hit the nail on the head with that. and i really thank you very much for backing that up. i would also like to see law enforcement down in that district 24/7 and that's where the budget comes in because i would also like to see hard core tactical law enforcement 24/7. the district needs tough action. all crime must be stopped. bring in law enforcement that is tough on crime. stop and frisk is a must, it must happen. these criminals are holding drugs, money, weapons, et cetera, et cetera. crime must be st
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this issue. a five minute presentation is not sufficient to that and my colleague will speak on the details of this. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you m
that people speak are examples of spontaneous order. law, i know we're here in the ray burn -- rayburn office building and everybody thinks they are involved in making law. the fact is, law evolves spon spontaneously. sometimes they turned to a neighbor to settle them. some of the wisest neighbors became known as judges. that's how precedent and case law built up. it was actually much into that process that government started saying let's write it down. and intrude it and change it through legislative or skeeverd. money, most people think money is something ben bernanke prints. but it evolved because again, people had problem. how do i trade? if i have a fish and you have an apple then we have an easy trade. but if i don't like apples and you have enough fish then we have to make the trade possibly among a larger group of people. again, the government took over the creation of money but they did not origin nate it. then there is -- originate it. does someone direct it? does congress instruct that food gets put in the grocery stores? >>, there is supply and there is demand. there are is this n
of what exactly is going on. we were able to confirm with a federal law enforcement official that the small aerial aircraft that we've been seeing kind of circling the property in the morning, that that was a surveillance aircraft. so that's what we've been seeing the last few days, and again police have been very tight-lipped and haven't said exactly what they have been finding or what the location -- or what the layout of dykes' property has been. >> gabe gutierrez, thank you so much. sorry -- you need to stay there, sorry, gabe. i wanted to ask you one more question concerning the bus driver. charles poland, who was laid to rest. he's being hailed as something of a hero because he was approached by the individual suspect and shot defending the other children on the bus. >> reporter: that's exactly right, martin. he's been hailed as a hero by this community. his funeral was yesterday. spoke of him as being a hero for getting in front of the suspect and for taking a bullet and giving his life essentially for these children. he protected more than 20 kids who were on this bus
results of our efforts to carry the sex trafficking. what you saw was raw law enforcement but it of us getting ready -- footage of us getting ready in driving out to rest a series of traffickers in se as part of an operation we called "dark night." it uncovered a prostitution ring in savannah, ga. that ultimately turned out to be much worse. it was an underworld of sexual exploitation lurking underneath the southeast united states. there is a major prostitution ring is not only in georgia but also in florida, south carolina, and north carolina. midsection of vickers recruiting young women -- we had to have occurs recruiting young men with false hopes of imitations of america only to force them into hard and unrelenting prostitution. what we did that morning was that we arrested 13 people involved in the trafficking of these women. at the same time we rescued 11 women who were in their complete control. most of them were 19-mid-20's from predominantly mexico and some from central mexico. we also arrested on as mr. and it charges 44 -- was also arrested 44 men on administrative charges.
than by the law. i can't tell you how many times when i was a lawyer and sometimes even now you read a opinion below andou say "what's motiving this?" is it the law or a person feeling? >> rose: what's the danger here? >> the danger is that you think of judges as computers, which we are not. we are human beings with strengths and weaknesses with limit takes in our life experiences. you want us to be aware of both those things. the good and the bad, the biases and the prejudices so that we actually work consciously at not letting them influence our outcomes. that we don't assume that we're right about our biases. that we don't assume that we're not human beings unaffected by our emotions. and that we work hard. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia tomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. she grew up in a p
weapons ban, high capacity magazines and background checks. the nra says current gun laws on background checks are not being enforced. you look at the statistics, people lie on background checks. felons attempt to get guns illegally on background checks and they're not prosecuted for lying. nobody is going after people lying on background checks. the nra said we don't need greater background checks. we need execution of the laws as they are. do they have a point? >> it's not an either/or. the laws have to be better enforced, but at the same time, we have to have a conversation about what we can do to prevent guns from getting into the hands of dangerous people. the brady law passed in 1993 has prevented nearly 2 million convicted felons, domestic abusers, dangerously mentally ill from buying a gun. did people fall through the cracks with the background checks? yes, and we should do something about it, but 40% of gun sales in the united states do not require a background check. it's not just the gun show loophole, it's the internet loophole, the newspaper classified loop pole. every day
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,226 (some duplicates have been removed)